Lessons from My Mother on Public Speaking

In Professional Growth by rafranzdavis0 Comments


Created with Haiku Deck, the free presentation app for iPad

My mother was and is a major source of inspiration in everything that I do. Growing up, she was the local “speaking” guru of our community. To be fair, she still is. Over the years she has coached kids to national titles, scholarships and a plethora of other awards for public speaking. Watching her work is like witnessing art as she poetically translates the words that she writes on paper into the message that she delivers. I think that all of us, myself and my siblings, have fond memories of rehearsals before performing. We did it so much that what she taught us has been forever ingrained in our memories.

I created the Haiku Deck above to share the lessons that she taught us about speaking. I’ve also included the comments below which are a part of this deck. However, when the deck is embedded, the comments are not seen. You can view it with its comments HERE.

1. Write with Purpose: Define, Engage Charge
A great public speech starts with great preparation…writing with purpose. A good speech captures the attention of an audience by grabbing them at the start, taking them on a journey and charging them with something to do…

2. Be Yourself, Speak from your soul.
Regardless of the nature of the public speech, the speaker must always remain true to themselves. Who you are should be evident through your words and delivery.

3. Practice to learn it. Never read from a paper.
Your public speeches should be a conversation with your audience. Know your thoughts well enough so that even if you need to look down for a second, you know where to go without hesitation.

4. Don’t be a stiff chicken. Have some personality.
Your public speeches should be a conversation with your audience. Know your thoughts well enough so that even if you need to look down for a second, you know where to go without hesitation.

5. Speak clearly. Enunciate every word.
It’s not “tha”. It’s “the”. Don’t say “A” with a short sound. Keep it long as the English language intended. Every phrase should be clearly articulated.

6. Include inflections. Speak with purposeful highs and lows.
Changing the pitch of a word when needed is key to phrasing. Those moments must be done with a purpose. No speech should be monotonous. There should be moments when vocal prowess is used to establish a mood.

7. Speak to your audience. Look them in the eyes.
My mom used to tell us to find a person in the audience to speak to. If we were being judged, make eye contact with them.

Doing this says…

I know exactly what I’m talking about!

Looking into the eyes of your audience also forms a connection between your message and their thoughts.

8. Be Confident. Act like you own the place.
When fully prepared, confidence comes easy. We practiced until we spoke in our sleep.

Even through nerves, if all else fails..

Fake it till you make it!

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