My EduParent Perspective: Balancing the Two A’s, Advocacy and Accountability

In parenting, personal by rafranzdavis1 Comment

If you have children in school, logging in to the online grading system is a necessity. Many of them even have alert settings and getting those alerts is critical to you supporting your child.

This is especially important for high school students.

In a perfect world, my son would tell
me every little detail of his life and for the most part, he does. However, when it comes to grades…my son often holds back and understandably so. I am his mother but I am also a teacher and it is sometimes difficult to turn the “super critical edu” part of me off.

I am working on it though.

Today I saw that my son had a zero in a class because he didn’t turn in a student information sheet that I know I signed. A part of me was annoyed with him for not turning it in and the other part of me was annoyed with his teacher for assigning a grade to an information sheet.

So, I emailed her to inquire about the purpose in doing that. Why would his grade be reflective of my signature in lieu of his work?

Long sigh…

She replied and after a short discussion followed by the exchange of a digitally signed signature sheet, I realized that sometimes I have to choose my battles. During this exchange, I actually shifted focus to building the relationship with my son’s teacher.

My son’s success depends on it.

One more thing…
After inquiring about grades in another class, my son’s teacher checked and found that he made a mistake in not giving him credit for something that he did. This too, was due to a few exchanges of building the relationship.

If you are thinking that these are things that my son could’ve done himself, you are partially correct.

The reality of being a black teen in a largely non-diverse environment is that student led advocacy is often misinterpreted as insubordination.

My visibility and involvement means that maybe he has a chance to navigate a few more of these waters by himself…with me watching from the distance.

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